Currin Family

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

My brother in law, Ian Broderson - Well, she did ask me to paint the fence before Rugby World Cup - National - NZ Herald News

Ian Broderson and his son Shane spruced up their house and fence to the delight of passing rugby fans in Wanganui. Photo / Mark Mitchell

Expand

Ian Broderson and his son Shane spruced up their house and fence to the delight of passing rugby fans in Wanganui. Photo / Mark Mitchell

When Ian Broderson's wife told him to paint the fence before the Rugby World Cup started, she got what she wished for - and then some.

A flurry of flag hunting and a day's worth of painting later, Mr Broderson and his son Shane spruced up their house and fence to the delight of passing rugby fans in Wanganui.

"It came about when my wife kept whingeing about me not painting the fence," said Mr Broderson, a meat boner. They got all the flags they could from local shops and when some, like Namibia's, proved difficult to get their hands on, they painted the rest.

Although Rosalie Broderson herself was not available for comment, her husband was adamant she loved it.

The Brodersons' front lawn bore a special greeting for the American team staying in Wanganui, and the family were delighted when locals at the airport tipped off the players, who drove by to cheer from the tour bus.

Mr Broderson said they would dismantle their shrine reluctantly at the end of the cup - unless New Zealand win, in which case they will paint it black: "I'm going to paint 'finally' across the fence." The missus will be delighted.

- Tania Shadwell

Well, she did ask me to paint the fence before Rugby World Cup - National - NZ Herald News

When Ian Broderson's wife told him to paint the fence before the Rugby World Cup started, she got what she wished for - and then some.

A flurry of flag hunting and a day's worth of painting later, Mr Broderson and his son Shane spruced up their house and fence to the delight of passing rugby fans in Wanganui.

"It came about when my wife kept whingeing about me not painting the fence," said Mr Broderson, a meat boner. They got all the flags they could from local shops and when some, like Namibia's, proved difficult to get their hands on, they painted the rest.

Although Rosalie Broderson herself was not available for comment, her husband was adamant she loved it.

The Brodersons' front lawn bore a special greeting for the American team staying in Wanganui, and the family were delighted when locals at the airport tipped off the players, who drove by to cheer from the tour bus.

Mr Broderson said they would dismantle their shrine reluctantly at the end of the cup - unless New Zealand win, in which case they will paint it black: "I'm going to paint 'finally' across the fence." The missus will be delighted.

- Tania Shadwell

Monday, September 26, 2011

Bitter melons - not my favourite

They grow very easily but to me , they taste very bad. How about you, do you like them?Lovely day and 26c.

Spring Grove School photo (post@currin-tly.posterous.com)

Click to open:
Google Docs makes it easy to create, store and share online documents, spreadsheets and presentations.
Logo for Google Docs

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Had visitors all day (post@currin-tly.posterous.com)

Attached: Had visitors all day
Google Docs makes it easy to create, store and share online documents, spreadsheets and presentations.
Logo for Google Docs

People keep coming to see us, bring some gifts and talk and want us go and have a meal.

We went eventually and had some more chili beef and some other bits and pieces

It is dark tonight (post@currin-tly.posterous.com)

Attached: It is dark tonight
Message from jcinanshan@gmail.com:
It is just a test that I am trying.


Google Docs makes it easy to create, store and share online documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

Logo for Google Docs

Where is the moon tonight

Oh, there it is!!

Saturday, September 24, 2011

Spring Grove School opens 1845 - my old school and others in the region

Education in Nelson - 1842-2002
Tools
Login
Email Page
Print this page
Contents
1 Education in Nelson - 1842-2002
2 Related Stories
3 Further sources
3.1 Books
3.2 Articles
3.3 Other
3.4 Web Resources


The Nelson Province played an important role in the history of New Zealand education. It was the first Province to initiate free public education, based on Matthew Campbell's secular school system, which became the model for the country. It had the first secondary school in New Zealand (Catholic) and the first secular secondary school, plus there is Wakefield School; the oldest continuous public school in New Zealand.
A timeline

Is your school listed here, or do we have Your Story about your school? You are welcome to submit a story about your school, or add a comment to this timeline so that we can add relevant dates.

Portrait of Matthew Campbell, The Nelson Provincial Museum, Tyree Studio Collection, 69466/3
Click to enlarge

1842-1900 ; 1900-

1842
March 27 - the first private school in the Nelson settlement opens in a house made of toi toi, in December it moves to a specially built room in Tasman Street
September 12: The Nelson Branch of the British and Foreign School Society, with land and financial support from the Nelson Wakefield Company (forerunner of New Zealand Company), opens the first public school in Nelson, located in Bridge Street near the eel pond. The headmaster is William Moore. It closes following the Wairau Affray in June 1843.
October: The Nelson School Society under the leadership of Matthew Campbell establishes the Nelson Day school [note - some sources say the School was established February 1844].

1844
January 1: Wakefield School is formally opened. Wakefield is the oldest continuous public school in New Zealand.
January 21: ‘Bishop's School' (Bishop Selwyn's Anglican School), a Church of England Elementary School is built in Nile Street, Nelson.

1845
May 18: Spring Grove School is opened.
December 28th: A school opens in Brook Green (the original name for Stoke) Later to become Stoke School

Rugby and league just wonderful in New Zealand tonight

First the All Blacks and then the Warriors, I think they heard me cheering all over China, wonderful night and had a call from my son, Paul in Italy, who was watching and yelling as well.

Friday, September 23, 2011

A spicy meal -Sichuan style for Alina's birthday

Alina had her birthday and took us all for a meal, I was sorely outnumbered being the only male but I put up with it and enjoyed the meal too.

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Had a haircut

A few weeks ago had to use a new barber as mine had closed down and the shop was being renovated, anyway, this morning decided it was time to have a trim and went off to the hairdresser.
Well, the old shop was now a new one and very smart too, gone was the old vinyl flooring an new tiles, gone were the old character packed chairs and new ones were in, gone was the hair washing chair which was certainly old and had a wobbly step to get onto it but did the job and new ones had appeared. The old lights and mirrors had gone, the shelving had gone and now my old barbers shop was a modern hairdressers with much more space.
To start, had to get the hair washed, twice, by the delightful, pretty young woman, she laid me down in the new chair and started to wash my locks, I thought that something was wrong and then realised that the washing chair was also giving me a massage.
At least my regular barber was there and gave me the normal treatment and I came out a new man.
So, it was out with the old and in with the new and a big price increase from ten to fifteen Yuan which means that after paying NZ$2.00 for several years I now need to pay NZ$3.00, a big increase actually.

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Different nations

I am watching Italy play Russia in my hometown of Nelson in New Zealand and sitting here in China drinking German beer

Monday, September 19, 2011

World Cup Rugby on the internet - how to watch

 No live rugby here in China so I hunted around and found Sky TV in Italy which take the feed from Sky TV in New Zealand and then it is sponsored to sub channels which are covered in ads. Some broadcasts are in English,some French or Italian but the pictures are great.
When you click on a game in the link - Click here it will open a new page and then click on link1 and just wait until it opens, do not click on any ads otherwise you will have all kinds of pop ups, eventually the game will appear and then you can click full screen and watch. If it doesn't work on link 1 go to 2 and so until you find one that suits. It is a bit of messing around but it works  great but be patient because each link goes through the ads before the game starts. Once you have a channel that suits and click full screen you will not see any ads during the game.
If you do not have any joy with the above link click on this one and then click rugby and then choose the game you want, also has league and many other sports, it is great for us living over here.
Hope you follow this or give a call on Skype or email, there is a game tomorrow from my hometown, Nelson. Hope it works for you.

Sunday, September 18, 2011

Six years in China and still cannot speak much Chinese

I know that many Kiwi's move to Australia and seem to speak fluent Australian after a few weeks, maybe Chinese is not so easy or I am not that gifted to become muli-lingual.

I arrived in China just before midnight 6 years ago and had my first class the next day. I had 300 Yuan and a job to go to and Mei to look after me. All worked out fine.

Coincidentally, my first boss, a friend of Mei's from childhood days, rang and asked Mei and I out for dinner last night which just happened to be the anniversary of my arrival. She picked us up and took us to this upmarket Chinese restaurant which looked very nice but decided that I should have a western style meal so off we go to a hotel and have a steak, very good though.

I am enjoying the rugby very much and feel very lucky to be able to watch all the games free through Sky TV in Italy, they are streamed on the internet, not always in English but the video quality is excellent, I can listen to NZ's Radio Sport for commentary if I want to.

It has turned cool very quickly, down to 2c last night but mid 20's during the day, the ice age is approaching.

Have a good week everybody.

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Fw: CANTANTE ESPECTACULAR

EL MOMENTO JUSTO ES._._SIEMPRE !!!.wmv Watch on Posterous

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Warwick Grimmer <warwickgrimmer@xtra.co.nz>
Date: Wed, Sep 14, 2011 at 20:05
Subject: Fw: CANTANTE ESPECTACULAR
To: John Currin <john@currinfamily.com>


 

From Maurice in Australia

At_narrabri_west_ruth_w_baby_m

I am watching the world cup on Sky TV from Italy complete with Italian commentary, that does not bother me to much as the pictures are perfect.

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Maurice Boyce <mg.boyce@hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, Sep 12, 2011 at 17:00
Subject: Postings & Comments
To: John and Mei Currin <johnandmei@live.com>


Hello John & Mei,
 
How are you both and thanks for all your updates and interesting posts. I liked the one where you experienced the local & traditional food! The picture of the gentleman humping the fridge in the stairwell says a lot about the can-do and will-do ethic of modern China. (Do that with an Aussie worker and you will be facing everything from a damages claim to a lecture from the OH&S authorities!)
 
The world Rugby cup, any coverage on your local TV. I understand that many NZers are understandably annoyed because their national game is only on Paaaay TV.
 
Back to the "50s", yes life was great for us kids before the "Nanny State" took over. Will attach a picture of a house we owned here in Oz for about 7 years, totally original 1920s farm cottage. First thing I did was install hot water and an inside loo. Otherwise we kept it pretty well original including the wood range in the kitchen that had to be accessed via the back verandah. (We eventually build a new house in town)
 
Hope you are both keeping well, lovely clear spring day here in Sydney, hopefully this tears seemingly unending winter is now behind us.
 
Al the best
 
MB

Monday, September 12, 2011

Mid-Autumn Festival - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
For other harvest festivals that may be known as Mid-Autumn Festival, see Mid-Autumn Festival (disambiguation).
For the Chinese New Year Lantern Festival known as Yuan Xiao (元宵節), Chap Goh Meh, Yuen Siu (元宵), Shang Yuan (上元), and Tết Nguyên Tiêu", see Lantern Festival.
This article may contain improper references to self-published sources. Please help improve it by removing references to unreliable sources, where they are used inappropriately. (September 2011)
Text document with red question mark.svg

This article's references may not meet Wikipedia's guidelines for reliable sources. Please help by checking whether the references meet the criteria for reliable sources. (September 2011)
Mid-Autumn Festival
Mid-Autumn Festival


Mid-Autumn Festival decorations in Beijing

Official name Zhōngqiū Jié (中秋節, 中秋节)
Also called Moon Festival
Mooncake Festival
Lantern Festival
Peh Goeh Cheh (八月節)
Observed by Chinese, Taiwanese, Vietnamese, Korean
Type Cultural, Religious
Significance Celebrates the end of the fall harvest
Date 15th day of the 8th lunar month
2011 date September 12
2012 date September 30
Observances consumption of mooncakes, worship of deities (Chang'e)
Related to Tết Trung Thu
Mid-Autumn Festival
Moon Cakes.jpg

Mooncakes, often eaten during the festival
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese 中秋節
Simplified Chinese 中秋节
[show]Transcriptions
Hakka
- Romanization Chung ciu tset
Mandarin
- Hanyu Pinyin Zhōngqiūjié
- Wade–Giles Chung ch'iu chieh
Min
- Hokkien POJ Tiong-chhiu-chiat
Cantonese
- Jyutping Zung1 cau1 zit3
- Yale Romanization Jung1 chyou1 jye2
Min name
Chinese 八月節
[show]Transcriptions
Min
- Hokkien POJ Peh-go̍eh-cheh
- Min-dong BUC Báik-nguŏk-cáik
Vietnamese name
Quốc ngữ Tết Trung Thu
Chữ nôm

Mid-Autumn Festival celebrations in Victoria Park, Hong Kong

Mid-Autumn Festival at the Botanical Garden, Montreal

The Mid-Autumn Festival (中秋節), also known as the Moon Festival or Zhongqiu Festival is a popular harvest festival celebrated by Chinese, Taiwanese, and Vietnamese people. Dating back over 3,000 years to moon worship in China's Shang Dynasty, it was first called Zhongqiu Jie (literally "Mid-Autumn Festival") in the Zhou Dynasty.[1] In Malaysia, Singapore, and the Philippines, it is also sometimes referred to as the Lantern Festival or Mooncake Festival.

The Mid-Autumn Festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Chinese calendar, which is in September or early October in the Gregorian calendar. It is a date that parallels the autumnal equinox of the solar calendar, when the moon is at its fullest and roundest. The traditional food of this festival is the mooncake, of which there are many different varieties. The Chinese festival is very traditional and a great way to celebrate.

The Mid-Autumn Festival is one of the few most important holidays in the Chinese calendar, the others being Spring Festival and Winter Solstice, and is a legal holiday in several countries. Farmers celebrate the end of the fall harvesting season on this date. Traditionally on this day, Chinese family members and friends will gather to admire the bright mid-autumn harvest moon, and eat moon cakes and pomelos under the moon together. Accompanying the celebration, there are additional cultural or regional customs, such as:

  • Carrying brightly lit lanterns, lighting lanterns on towers, floating sky lanterns
  • Burning incense in reverence to deities including Chang'e
  • Erect the Mid-Autumn Festival.(树中秋,竖中秋,in China,树 and 竖 are homophones)It is not about planting trees but hanging lanterns on the bamboo pole and putting them on a high point, such as roofs, trees, terraces, etc. It is a custom in Guangzhou, Hong Kong, etc.
  • Collecting dandelion leaves and distributing them evenly among family members
  • Fire Dragon Dances

Shops selling mooncakes before the festival often display pictures of Chang'e floating to the moon.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Stories of the Mid-Autumn Festival

[edit] Houyi and Chang'e

Main articles: Houyi and Chang'e

Celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival is strongly associated with the legend of Houyi and Chang'e, the Moon Goddess of Immortality. Tradition places these two figures from Chinese mythology at around 2200 BCE, during the reign of the legendary Emperor Yao, shortly after that of Huangdi. Unlike many lunar deities in other cultures who personify the moon, Chang'e simply lives on the moon but is not the moon herself.

There are many variants and adaptations of the legend of Chang'e that frequently contradict each other. However, most versions of the legend involve some variation of the following elements: Houyi, the Archer, an emperor, either benevolent or malevolent, and an elixir of life.

One version of the legend states that Houyi was an immortal and Chang'e was a beautiful young girl, working in the palace of the Jade Emperor (the Emperor of Heaven, 玉帝 pinyin:Yùdì) as an attendant to the Queen Mother of the West (the Jade Emperor's wife). Houyi aroused the jealousy of the other immortals, who then slandered him before the Jade Emperor. Houyi and his wife, Chang'e, were subsequently banished from heaven. They were forced to live on Earth. Houyi had to hunt to survive and became a skilled and famous archer.

At that time, there were ten suns, in the form of three-legged birds, residing in a mulberry tree in the eastern sea. Each day one of the sun birds would have to travel around the world on a carriage, driven by Xihe, the 'mother' of the suns. One day, all ten of the suns circled together, causing the Earth to burn. Emperor Yao, the Emperor of China, commanded Houyi to use his archery skill to shoot down all but one of the suns. Upon completion of his task, the Emperor rewarded Houyi with a pill that granted eternal life. Emperor Yao advised Houyi not to swallow the pill immediately but instead to prepare himself by praying and fasting for a year before taking it.[2] Houyi took the pill home and hid it under a rafter. One day, Houyi was summoned away again by Emperor Yao. During her husband's absence, Chang'e, noticed a white beam of light beckoning from the rafters, and discovered the pill. Chang'e swallowed it and immediately found that she could fly. Houyi returned home, realizing what had happened he began to reprimand his wife. Chang'e escaped by flying out the window into the sky.[2]

Houyi pursued her halfway across the heavens but was forced to return to Earth because of strong winds. Chang'e reached the moon, where she coughed up part of the pill.[2] Chang'e commanded the hare that lived on the moon to make another pill. Chang'e would then be able to return to Earth and her husband.[citation needed]

The legend states that the hare is still pounding herbs, trying to make the pill. Houyi built himself a palace in the sun, representing "Yang" (the male principle), in contrast to Chang'e's home on the moon which represents "Yin" (the female principle). Once a year, on the night of the Mid-Autumn Festival, Houyi visits his wife. That is the reason why the moon is very full and beautiful on that night.[2]

This description appears in written form in two Western Han dynasty (206 BC-24 AD) collections; Shan Hai Jing, the Classic of the Mountains and Seas and Huainanzi, a philosophical classic.[3]

Another version of the legend, similar to the one above, differs in saying that Chang'e swallowed the pill of immortality because Peng, one of Houyi's many apprentice archers, tried to force her to give the pill to him. Knowing that she could not fight off Peng, Chang'e had no choice but to swallow the pill herself.[citation needed]

Other versions say that Houyi and Chang'e were still immortals living in heaven at the time that Houyi killed nine of the suns. The sun birds were the sons of the Jade Emperor, who punished Houyi and Chang'e by forcing them to live on Earth as mortals. Seeing that Chang'e felt extremely miserable over her loss of immortality, Houyi decided to find the pill that would restore it. At the end of his quest, he met the Queen Mother of the West, who agreed to give him the pill, but warned him that each person would only need half a pill to regain immortality. Houyi brought the pill home and stored it in a case. He warned Chang'e not to open the case, and then left home for a while. Like Pandora in Greek mythology, Chang'e became curious. She opened up the case and found the pill, just as Houyi was returning home. Nervous that Houyi would catch her, discovering the contents of the case, she accidentally swallowed the entire pill, and started to float into the sky because of the overdose.

Some versions of the legend do not refer to Houyi or Chang'e as having previously been immortals and initially present them as mortals instead.[citation needed]

There are also versions of the story in which Houyi was made king as a reward for killing nine of the suns and saving the people. However, King Houyi became a despot who either stole a pill of immortality from the Queen Mother of the West or learned that he could make such a pill by grinding up the body of a different adolescent boy every night for a hundred nights. Chang'e stole the pill and swallowed it herself, either to stop more boys being killed or to prevent her husband's tyrannical rule from lasting forever.[citation needed]

[edit] The Hare or The Jade Rabbit

According to tradition, the Jade Rabbit pounds medicine, together with the lady, Chang'e, for the gods. Others say that the Jade Rabbit is a shape, assumed by Chang'e herself. The dark areas to the top of the full moon may be construed as the figure of a rabbit. The animal's ears point to the upper right, while at the left are two large circular areas, representing its head and body.[4]

[edit] Overthrow of Mongol rule

According to a widespread folk tale (not necessarily supported by historical records), the Mid-Autumn Festival commemorates an uprising in China against the Mongol rulers of the Yuan Dynasty (1280–1368) in the 14th century.[5] As group gatherings were banned, it was impossible to make plans for a rebellion.[5] Noting that the Mongols did not eat mooncakes, Liu Bowen (劉伯溫) of Zhejiang Province, advisor to the Chinese rebel leader Zhu Yuanzhang, came up with the idea of timing the rebellion to coincide with the Mid-Autumn Festival. He sought permission to distribute thousands of moon cakes to the Chinese residents in the city to bless the longevity of the Mongol emperor. Inside each cake, however, was inserted a piece of paper with the message: "Kill the Mongols on the 15th day of the 8th month" (traditional Chinese: 八月十五殺韃子; simplified Chinese: 八月十五杀鞑子).[5] On the night of the Moon Festival, the rebels successfully attacked and overthrew the government. What followed was the establishment of the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644), under Zhu. Henceforth, the Mid-Autumn Festival was celebrated with moon cakes on a national level.

[edit] Taiwan version

Due to historical cultural ties with China, legends of the holiday in Taiwan share major feature of the Chinese version.

Since middle of 1980’s, Taiwanese starts the trend of barbecue with friends and family at Mid-Autumn Festival. This trend trace from different statements, some said that it started because of the boost of commercial company, others said that it is because people usually get hungry when they are watching the moon, so barbecue outdoor become widespread among people. However, the take off of Taiwan economy and the influence of western life style was also a reason which makes people change their traditional custom. Mooncakes are typically round but smaller, with less elaborate fillings. More recently, some versions of the cake from Hong Kong seem to be gaining popularity.

[edit] Vietnamese version

Vietnamese children celebrating the Mid-Autumn Festival with traditional 5-pointed star-shaped lantern

The Mid-Autumn festival is named "Tết Trung Thu" in Vietnamese.

The Vietnamese version of the holiday recounts the legend of Cuội, whose wife accidentally urinated on a sacred banyan tree, taking him with it to the Moon. Every year, on the mid-autumn festival, children light lanterns and participate in a procession to show Cuội the way to Earth.[6]

In Vietnam, Mooncakes are typically square rather than round, though round ones do exist. Besides the indigenous tale of the banyan tree, other legends are widely told including the story of the Moon Lady, and the story of the carp who wanted to become a dragon.[6]

One important event before and during Vietnamese Mid-Autumn Festival are lion dances. The dances are performed by both non-professional children group and trained professional groups. Lion dance groups perform on the streets go to houses asking for permission to perform for them. If accepted by the host, "the lion" will come in and start dancing as a wish of luck and fortune and the host gives back lucky money to show thankfulness.

[edit] Dates

The Mid-Autumn Festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Chinese calendar, which is in September or early October in the Gregorian calendar. In 2010 the Mid-Autumn Festival fell on September 22. It will occur on these days in coming years:[7]

  • 2011: September 12
  • 2012: September 30
  • 2013: September 19
  • 2014: September 8
  • 2015: September 27
  • 2016: September 15
  • 2017: October 4
  • 2018: September 24
  • 2019: September 13
  • 2020: October 1

[edit] See also

[edit] References

[edit] External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Mid-Autumn Festival


[show]v · d · e
Golden Weeks National Day

Other Holidays
[show]v · d · eTaiwan topics
History

Topics
Society
Culture
Economy
Geography
[show]v · d · e
History
Politics
Government

Executive
Legislative
Economy
Transport
Geography
Society
Arts
Other topics
Portal  · WikiProject  · Outline
View page ratings
Rate this page

Trustworthy

Objective

Complete

Well-written

We will send you a confirmation e-mail. We will not share your address with anyone. (Privacy policy)

Submit ratings
Saved successfully
Your ratings have not been submitted yet

Your ratings have expired
Please reevaluate this page and submit new ratings.
An error has occured. Please try again later.
Thanks! Your ratings have been saved.
Please take a moment to complete a short survey.

Start survey Maybe later

Thanks! Your ratings have been saved.
Do you want to create an account?
An account will help you track your edits, get involved in discussions, and be a part of the community.
Create an accountorLog in Maybe later
Thanks! Your ratings have been saved.
Did you know that you can edit this page?

Edit this page Maybe later